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in reply to Building the Right Thing (Part III): Customers

Interesting post.

A few months ago, I spent an hour at Freshbooks, answering questions for a $50 gift card. It was a really interesting session, and the two poeple running the session did two things right. 1. They encouraged me to think out loud as I explored and evaluated the various screens -- which is something I also heard during my interviews with Google. What's going on inside a test subject's head is really what they are interested in. 2. They knew when to move from just observing what I was doing into the more probing "Tell why .." or "How would you improve .." questions.

It's quite an art to extract the most juice from a willing test subject. And it's vital research for a company to be doing.

Alex / talexb / Toronto

Thanks PJ. We owe you so much. Groklaw -- RIP -- 2003 to 2013.

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Re^2: Building the Right Thing (Part III): Customers
by eyepopslikeamosquito (Bishop) on Nov 03, 2015 at 10:11 UTC

    A few months ago, I spent an hour at Freshbooks, answering questions for a $50 gift card. It was a really interesting session, and the two people running the session did two things right. They encouraged me to think out loud as I explored and evaluated the various screens...
    Interesting to learn of your experience. Though not a UX professional, thinking out loud seems an excellent way to do it. I see that usability testing has got a lot cheaper and faster in recent years, with many web sites popping up, offering a variety of testing services, for example, usertesting.com ("get videos of real people speaking their thoughts...") and many others.

    Another way for smaller companies to do UX research cheaply (well, cheaper than your $50 gift card) is to go into a coffee shop with a laptop and offer to pay for people's coffee in exchange for them having a go at using your software.