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Re: Tiobe index - Perl is having a hard time

by RonW (Parson)
on May 01, 2018 at 21:34 UTC ( #1213907=note: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Tiobe index - Perl is having a hard time

And still today the Perl community hasn't defined a clear future

I'm not sure what he means by this. My best guess is a perceived lack of a series of "5 year plans" stating what changes are planned, for which releases and when those releases are scheduled.

Perl is maintained (mostly?) by unpaid volunteers. Maybe Python, Ruby, etc - whatever is touted as being "the future that Perl won't have" - have corporate backing that Perl doesn't have. Or, maybe the people maintaining them are more like the (highly paid) "MS Project Jockies" that manage projects for big corporations. I don't know.

I think what's most damaging to Perl is commentary like what the OP quoted. Unfortunately, I don't know how to counter it.

Update: Radical idea: Drop the "5" and call the next major release "Perl 28.0". (except, Larry won't allow that)

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Re^2: Tiobe index - Perl is having a hard time
by Anonymous Monk on May 31, 2018 at 17:39 UTC
      "I think what's most damaging to Perl is commentary like what the OP quoted. Unfortunately, I don't know how to counter it."
    I think one solution is to continuously hack the planet with excellent must-have software written in Perl! It doesn't even have to be complicated. As the ultimate glue language Perl has an infinite number of potentialities.

    For example Perl is installed by default on OSX and Linux. Both of these operating systems have around 2000 command line programs. Few Mac users know what lurks beneath the desktop. Perl can expose this power by wrapping and combining system commands and canning complex syntax to invent new commands that make hard things easy.

    Fortunately packaging Perl programs for cross-platform distribution has never been easier!

    $0.02

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