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What's the best Perl CMS?

by cosmicperl (Chaplain)
on Apr 10, 2008 at 23:28 UTC ( #679590=perlquestion: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??

cosmicperl has asked for the wisdom of the Perl Monks concerning the following question:

Hi All,
  I did a search on this but could only find posts from several years ago, so I was wondering what the current state of affairs is...

I remember when I first came across CMS sites years ago.. and I hated them. Most of them didn't seem to generate good code, didn't seem to have much chance of appearing high in google (or Altavista, lol) and just didn't seem like it was as proper as good old textpad HTML with some SSI as needed.
I decided not to use them thinking they wouldn't amount to much... BOY was I wrong!

I recently had to do some client work on Drupal and Plone, CMS has certainly come a very long way since I last looked at it, and it's certainly something I need to get up to speed with.

Having decided to learn a lot more about Drupal and Plone so that I can offer more services, I suddenly stopped myself and thought, "wait a minute.. Drupal is PHP.. Plone is Python.. and I'm a Perl programmer"

I always end up doing little hacks to software I use and I'd much rather be hacking in Perl and promoing Perl based applications to my clients.

So what is (or are) the best Perl CMS system(s)?
My requirements are:-
  • Must be platform independent (at least Linux/Win)
  • MySQL may be a requirement, but I'd be just as happy with flatfile
  • Must be extensible
  • Must be easy for Novice (end user) to use


I'm hoping there are people here with some good experience with this ;)

Lyle

Replies are listed 'Best First'.
Re: What's the best Perl CMS?
by dragonchild (Archbishop) on Apr 11, 2008 at 00:02 UTC
    Mojomojo is a CMS being build upon Catalyst by marcus, but I don't know if it's progressed beyond toy status. Frankly, I'd use Trac or Jira. Hacking the code for a tool is ... iffy. It's much cheaper to just pay the developers to add what you want. Think about it - your time is worth between $80-$100/hr. Let's say that it takes you a day to get something up and running. That's about $750 all told. That doesn't count the 3-4 days it took for you to get familiar with the codebase, so add on another $2k. Most CMS owners would gladly take on a little fix for $2k and your company saves $1k and it's now maintained by the owners themselves.

    Now, you have what you want, it's blessed by the devs, your company has cred with and exposure to the community, and you've been productive elsewhere. Sounds like a win-win-win all around.


    My criteria for good software:
    1. Does it work?
    2. Can someone else come in, make a change, and be reasonably certain no bugs were introduced?
Re: What's the best Perl CMS?
by ady (Deacon) on Apr 11, 2008 at 05:48 UTC
    I did a comparative evaluation 3-4 years ago, and ended up choosing metadot for an inhouse/intranet wiki.

    This product seems to fulfill your requirements (It runs primarily on Linux, Apache, MySQL and Perl and supports Sun Solaris, Windows OSes and Oracle database. ). It was relatively easy to install and configure. The source was fairly well structured, and easy to modify. The support from the developers was fine.

    That said, Portal/CMS applications come in a wide variety with respect to functionality, configurability, plug-inn's &c.

    best regards
    allan dystrup
      I had come across that one. Looking closer it does seems pretty good, and matches my spec.

      I've also come across WebGUI which looks good but I'm put off by the design of their site. The overall design is ok.. I suppose, but that text under the logo "Web Done Right".. considering it's a struggle to actually read that text I wouldn't particularly say that's done right. Hard to read text such as white on light background is one of my pet peeves.

      I'm considering fashioning my own using Wiki::Toolkit and an JavaScript WYSIWYG HTML editor although I don't like the through of the maintenance. I've got more than enough coding work to do at the moment!
        As far as WYSIWYG JavaScript HTML editors, you might take a look at TinyMCE as well. It's used by many CMS packages as an option or as the default visual page editor. That includes Mambo, Joomla, Drupal, and the venerable Citadel.

        I've recently updated the TinyMCE plugin for Lucid to use TinyMCE 3.0.6, and I should be getting that posted to the repository Real Soon Now (once I have some more testing and feedback).

        Besides being fairly easy to make into a plugin for a CMS, it's pretty easy for a JavaScript programmer to write plugins for TinyMCE itself. I should know, because I'm not a great JavaScript guy and I've done a few. The plugin model was one of the changes between the 2.x branch and the 3.0 branch, so I've actually written and rewritten a few.

        The license for TinyMCE is LGPL, so if you're looking seriously at licenses that's good to know.

        ALl that said, HTMLArea I hear is pretty good, so don't let me dissuade you from it if it ends up being a better match for your needs.

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      I did a comparative evaluation 3-4 years ago, and ended up choosing metadot for an inhouse/intranet wiki.I did a comparative evaluation 3-4 years ago, and ended up choosing metadot for an inhouse/intranet wiki.

      Hi!

      I took a look at the code, very impressive and inspiring too. I see that there are 2 versions, one free open source and the other is commercial.
      What is the main difference between too?
      Is there a significance different in the support given to users of the non commercial version comparing to the commercial one?

      I recommend all of you to try this CMS before trying any PHP CMS.
        Back then (remember, that's 3-4yrs. back), there was only one product: the Metadot Portal Server, and it was free, as in 'GPL' (GNU General Public License); That seems still to be the case (as I read the Metadot homepage).

        As for support, now (as back then) you have two options:

        * the user forums, which today seems to be primarily run by the user community; 3-4yrs ago the developers would frequently participate, if a Q had been lying around for a day or two without an A; That may have changed now.

        * the commercial offers of help with installation, training, hosting, trouble shooting &c; You pay for these professional services, - that's what puts butter on the Metadot Corp. developers toast.

        The product is well documented (which was one of the requirements in my evaluation), and a programmer with basic experience in OS and Perl should have no trouble installing and configuring it. And getting answers to /h(is|er)/ questions in the free forums.

        best regards
        Allan Dystrup
Re: What's the best Perl CMS?
by mr_mischief (Monsignor) on Apr 11, 2008 at 00:42 UTC
    This is coming from left field, but my favorite CMS is actually written in PHP. It's LucidCMS, which my web clients just love.

    You might notice if you look carefully enough that I have a commit bit I've yet to use directly in the SVN for the plugins and that I help answer questions on the forums as I get a chance.

    It takes very little time to install, it's easy to write plugins for it, it has a database independence layer, and it has a tag-based template system for page parts.

    My business partner and I have been discussing whether I should port it to Perl as I have time so that I can customize it and write plugins for it even more easily. There's already a Python clone of it in development called PyLucid. If anyone is willing to help with a Perl port, I'd be happy to know.

Re: What's the best Perl CMS?
by Joost (Canon) on Apr 10, 2008 at 23:48 UTC
    Not to be contrary but:
    # Must be platform independent (at least Linux/Win)
    # MySQL may be a requirement, but I'd be just as happy with flatfile
    What for?

    Extensible & easy to use are reasonable requirements, but who cares what kind of database or OS you need to run it on, as long as it's not hideously expensive or unstable. Why not run it on ruby/freebsd/postgres (just as an example)?.

    I can't really give you an answer to your general question though, since every single generic CMS I've looked at sucks in more than a few ways (anything from generating hideous markup and being hard to work with as an end user to being far too inflexible and/or difficult to upgrade with custom patches/changes). And I don't really care about the implementation language (as long as the language doesn't preclude it from being reasonably cheap and easy to deploy and extend).

      Not to be contrary but:
      # Must be platform independent (at least Linux/Win)
      # MySQL may be a requirement, but I'd be just as happy with flatfile

      What for?
      So that I can use the same solution whether the client has windows hosting or Linux hosting. Both tend to have MySQL available these days, largely due to the popularity of php on Windows.
      I haven't tried all the others, but after years of hands-on with using WebAPP, I'd still say it's got to be the best. Although some would like to claim elsewise, the development community for WebAPP is and always has been at web-app.org. WebAPP - Automated Perl Portal, EST 2002 by M. Carter Brown.
        Not quite true, the WebAPP has been developed in the past by Carter, but both Carter and the script itself and development has moved to http://www.web-app.net
      Tree Multimedia Portal (Open sourse, perl, MVC, Alpha testing ) Tree Portal (Open sourse, perl, MVC Catalyst) http://www.x0.org.ua Alpha testing!! (2009.1.10) development of an open multimedia engine Tree Portal on defined framework MVC Catalyst (perl) , with the innovative possibilities of setting up partitions, content, comments, photo albums, video albums, groups of social networking with the designer of questioning (as vkontakte.ru) and much more ... http://www.x0.org.ua/view_content/48 http://www.x0.org.ua/view_section/178 http://www.x0.org.ua/view_global_section http://www.x0.org.ua/video/ http://www.x0.org.ua/video_album/3 http://www.x0.org.ua/video/view/3/52 http://www.x0.org.ua/photo http://www.x0.org.ua/photo/view/9/93
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Re: What's the best Perl CMS?
by perrin (Chancellor) on Apr 11, 2008 at 12:30 UTC
    Although it doesn't meet your requirement to run on Windows, I recommend looking at Krang. It's mature, very extensible, in daily use on many sites, has a slick UI, and commercial support is available.
      Hi, What you are looking for is the flat db cms portal rom WebAPP at: WebAPP CMS Portal It has all the requirements requested by you. In addition, despite the fact that it uses fat files, it is much faster then any CMS out there, this is because starting from version 1.0 SE it has a cache and restore system. It is very easy to install, it would actually el extract itself and guide you with information all the way! Good luck! Moshe
        From what I see at that site, it looks interesting. A few things give me pause, though.

        I haven't found a license for the software. I was informed that I'd have to join their forums in order to download the software and presented an agreement for that.

        Since I have to sign up as a user (and marketing statistic, since they claim a certain number of registered users as a plus on the site) to download it, I didn't. That means I can't critique the code at all.

        The website flies the W3's banner for being CSS validated, but about every page I go to causes CSS parsing errors in my browser (Firefox 2.0.0.13 on Linux).

        The providers of WebAPP give "legal and security warnings" against getting their code from anywhere other than from their site. Since they've recently been subject to a spin-off being exploited in a way they say their official version isn't, that's probably fair. Yet another page says that all versions until the most recent of the official branch were remotely exploitable, too.

        That same page revealing the pre-1.0 vulnerabilities calls the CMS a "free open source CMS portal", which makes me wonder just what "free" and "open source" license it is distributed under which calls for legal warnings and claims of "piratical spin-off sites" when the code is redistributed.

        It may be a very nice CMS, but there are just too many issues with its site and community for me, personally, to seriously consider it.

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Re: What's the best Perl CMS?
by Anonymous Monk on Apr 25, 2008 at 09:00 UTC
    Most of them didn't seem to generate good code, didn't seem to have much chance of appearing high in google (or Altavista, lol)....

    best perl cms
Re: What's the best Perl CMS?
by Anonymous Monk on Jul 23, 2009 at 12:11 UTC
    http://cgi.crestodigitals.com/admin/ id: admin password: demodemo
      It's an old thread I know and this is going to sound spammy, but I've just released my new CMS. It's GPL and will give anything else a run for its money. Seriously, not just a blow in the wind comment. It's also Perl!

      Check it out: www.igaro.com

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