Beefy Boxes and Bandwidth Generously Provided by pair Networks
There's more than one way to do things
 
PerlMonks  

Re^2: how did blocking IO become such a problem?

by zentara (Archbishop)
on Feb 17, 2012 at 11:55 UTC ( [id://954515]=note: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Re: how did blocking IO become such a problem?
in thread how did blocking IO become such a problem?

Imagine having to clone your phone every time before making a call, so that you could throw it away afterwards if you received a second call during the first :)

True, but these are not real entities, like phones, they are easily created and discarded magnetic fields. With the increase in modern processor speeds, surely we could spare a few extra cpu cycles, to make that happen to avoid the problem.

By the way, what would be a good way to generate a blocked I/O condition, for testing? Download a big file, then drop your network?


I'm not really a human, but I play one on earth.
Old Perl Programmer Haiku ................... flash japh
  • Comment on Re^2: how did blocking IO become such a problem?

Replies are listed 'Best First'.
Re^3: how did blocking IO become such a problem?
by BrowserUk (Patriarch) on Feb 17, 2012 at 14:16 UTC
    With the increase in modern processor speeds, surely we could spare a few extra cpu cycles, to make that happen to avoid the problem.

    That was only a tongue-in-cheek analogy, but the problem of with the leap into the stack and transfer the program flow to some other place in the program at any given instance in time remains.

    Perhaps a better analogy is allowing the audience, or even the actors on stage, to take phone calls in the middle of a performance. The thought trains involved are even more nebulous patterns of firing neurons, but still the impact is not confined to the individual, but upon all other partisipants. Audience and players combined. And recovery is just as difficult.

    There are much better ways of dealing with the indeterminate nature of blocking IO: namely. Asynchronous IO which is available on most platforms, and has been for years. But I don't think it ever made it into that dead dodo of a standard that is POSIX?

    By the way, what would be a good way to generate a blocked I/O condition, for testing?

    The very simplest is my $input = <STDIN>;.


    With the rise and rise of 'Social' network sites: 'Computers are making people easier to use everyday'
    Examine what is said, not who speaks -- Silence betokens consent -- Love the truth but pardon error.
    "Science is about questioning the status quo. Questioning authority".
    In the absence of evidence, opinion is indistinguishable from prejudice.

    The start of some sanity?

    A reply falls below the community's threshold of quality. You may see it by logging in.

Log In?
Username:
Password:

What's my password?
Create A New User
Domain Nodelet?
Node Status?
node history
Node Type: note [id://954515]
help
Chatterbox?
and the web crawler heard nothing...

How do I use this?Last hourOther CB clients
Other Users?
Others avoiding work at the Monastery: (3)
As of 2024-05-30 06:56 GMT
Sections?
Information?
Find Nodes?
Leftovers?
    Voting Booth?

    No recent polls found