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Interesting. I can see where some of these may actually contradict each other. For example, "Do The Simplest Thing That Could Possibly Work" often means "cut and paste" which is the exact opposite of "Don't Repeat Yourself". Refactoring is not the simplest way to get things to work. Which, it seems, after following some of your links, is part of their description. To be honest, they started sounding like complex ideas all over again ;-) You need enough experience to tell when something is simple yet still abiding by all the other rules.

Further, I really have to disagree with your first one: "You Arent Gonna Need It". I've spent years maintaining a project that was developed this way. And we're just finishing up over the next couple of months the complete, ground-up rewrite (which started back in 2001). The rewrite has flexibilities that we'll never use. Or at least, we think we'll probably never use. But more than one flexibility has caught us by suprise when it proved useful when a last-minute design change comes in which we can handle by a small tweak in a data file, or minor code changes/additions (or both). We have a marketing department that likes to make changes to our product lineup and functionality after we ship the golden master CDs to manufacturing. And I'm not exaggerating here one bit. You don't get this type of flexibility by writing code when you need it, you get this type of flexibility by writing a framework that does it already.

For the curious, we had to tell manufacturing to ignore the CDs that were on their way, and reburn CDs immediately, and then courier those. But we could add our changes in minutes. Waiting until the requirements came in would have caused a delay of hours or days, which likely would have meant we couldn't meet the new requirements and the schedule at the same time, which, presuming a competent marketing department, would mean we couldn't meet end-customer needs.


In reply to Re^2: On Quality by Tanktalus
in thread On Quality by Tanktalus

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