in reply to Is it worth knowing Perl? Real-life examples please

I chose to learn Perl, because I already knew JavaScript and HTML/CSS. And I wanted to learn a server-side scripting language that is well known, well established and plenty of free documentation exists online. I also learned that all Linux computers have perl, which means if I learn this language, I will be able to write programs for Linux. That was my other goal. I want to transition from using Windows to Linux, and I saw that learning perl is the best option. It's like killing two birds with one stone. I'll not only learn a server-side scripting language, but I will also learn how to program Linux. Perfect combination. It's a well-established language, very well known and if the language has any bugs, they are already figured out by now.

Choosing between Perl and Python would be very easy for me. I don't like the way Python programs look like with all those indentations and missing opening/closing brackets. That is just creepy. Most servers do not offer Python scripting, but they most all support Perl, because as I said, perl is well established and well known.

For me, the big decision was going with PHP or Perl. PHP is faster and very well-known and very popular. PHP has a lot of advantages over other languages. The #1 thing I do not like about PHP is that PHP code has to reside within HTML files, which are usually already packed with JavaScript/CSS and other stuff. So, if we add PHP into the mix, the files are going to look like total chaos. I also had a hard time testing PHP programs, because I had to upload my php scripts to the web server before I could see them run. It was very inefficient and just a pain. I could not see myself enjoying PHP programming.

Computer programming and webdesign are my hobbies, so this isn't my main job or career. If you want to be a computer programmer or webdesigner, you should learn ALL languages -- Perl, PHP, Go, Ruby, C#, C++, assembly, HTML/CSS, Java, JavaScript, BASIC, R, and everything. You won't be able to compete in today's market if you only know a fraction of what everybody else knows!

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Re^2: Is it worth knowing Perl? Real-life examples please
by Your Mother (Archbishop) on Nov 03, 2019 at 22:04 UTC
    If you want to be a computer programmer or webdesigner, you should learn ALL languages -- Perl, PHP, Go, Ruby, C#, C++, assembly, HTML/CSS, Java, JavaScript, BASIC, R, and everything…

    The more tools you master, the better for you, of course, but BASIC? Everything? Or you won’t be able to compete…? The things everybody else knows?!¡¡¿⁄¿¡÷11!

Re^2: Is it worth knowing Perl? Real-life examples please
by hippo (Chancellor) on Nov 03, 2019 at 23:45 UTC
    I want to transition from using Windows to Linux, and I saw that learning perl is the best option. It's like killing two birds with one stone. I'll not only learn a server-side scripting language, but I will also learn how to program Linux. Perfect combination.

    This. Perl is fantastic (as everyone knows). It's doubly fantastic on a decent O/S. Perfect combination indeed.

    PHP is faster

    That's intriguing. Maybe you mean "faster to learn", perhaps because there's less of it? Dunno. Do tell.