in reply to How is Perl for automation?

Hi,

Thanks for the answers guys. But if I may ask, what about the job prospects? Is Perl viewed as not such a positive skill anymore? Pardon the bluntness but I'm a Tech Consultant of 40+ trying to add a scripting language to my skillset and I can really only learn 1 scripting language as of now, what with rest of my time divided between family, job and other technologies to study. From what the internet seems to tellnme, Perl is not that in demand, but that could be a good reason to focus on it, cause may be there's lot more python or ruby folks there than Perl. Sorry if I've ruffled some feathers, but just wanted to know.

Also, any book you could suggest? Or something on Udemy?

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Re^2: How is Perl for automation?
by GrandFather (Saint) on Dec 02, 2020 at 22:08 UTC

    For most purposes individual languages are less important than experience. Most competent programmers can pick up and be productive in a language they haven't previously used fairly quickly. So in a way it doesn't matter if it is Perl, Python, Ruby or a slew of other languages. As a practical thing you are likely to get much better support learning Perl here than learning any other language anywhere else, and in the long run that may be the most important criteria for picking your next language.

    Optimising for fewest key strokes only makes sense transmitting to Pluto or beyond

      Judging by the speed and quality of answers I see here, I fully agree. Thank you Sir.

Re^2: How is Perl for automation?
by hippo (Chancellor) on Dec 02, 2020 at 22:09 UTC
    From what the internet seems to tellnme, Perl is not that in demand

    You must be on some other internet. Mine says this.

    Also, any book you could suggest?

    Loads here - take your pick! Perhaps Automating System Administration With Perl might be a good option, once you have picked up the basics.


    🦛

      Man....that's some eye opener. Thanks.

      Sorry for the multi posting but, I had to say this....so if Im to believe the graph, then Perl being "dead" or "not in demand" or "disliked" is just FUD. Thanks again.

        The one unequivocal conclusion is that anyone saying that Perl is "not in demand" is clearly as wrong as it is possible to be.

        Being "dead" is somewhat more arbitrary and I'm not sure how you could come up with a solid quantitative measure. However, metacpan maintains a list of recent module releases which shows double-digit numbers every day. That isn't what I would expect to see with a "dead" language.

        That only leaves "disliked", which is probably the most subjective and arbitrary of all. Quantifying that would be a fool's errand. The only way to really tell if you dislike a language is to try it. That's how I know I dislike Java. And PHP.


        🦛

Re^2: How is Perl for automation?
by eyepopslikeamosquito (Bishop) on Dec 02, 2020 at 22:05 UTC

    Re Job prospects and comparing Perl to other languages, I keep a list of similar nodes here (see especially the "Recent Nodes (2020)" section at the end).

Re^2: How is Perl for automation?
by eyepopslikeamosquito (Bishop) on Dec 02, 2020 at 22:20 UTC
Re^2: How is Perl for automation?
by Bod (Chaplain) on Dec 02, 2020 at 21:32 UTC

    what about the job prospects?

    I cannot give you a direct answer as I left employment over 15 years ago and have worked for myself ever since - I am now unemployable and that's the way it will stay...

    What I would say is that Perl is so much more than just a scripting language. It is very capable at scripting but can be used to create standalone Windows applications with the TK modules or distributed client/server systems and everything in between. Learning Perl opens up many, many possibilities and makes learning other languages easier in future.

    Perhaps a jobs site might give you an indication of the demand...