AnomalousMonk has asked for the wisdom of the Perl Monks concerning the following question:

I know I've seen discussions of the "popularity" (i.e., number of shops using it, demand for programmers, etc.) of Perl versus other languages in these precincts before, but I can't seem to formulate productive PerlMonks or Google search terms that yield open site(s) providing this info. Can anyone please help?

Many aTdHvAaNnKcSe for any site suggestions or insight as to the proper way to proceed.


Give a man a fish:  <%-{-{-{-<

Replies are listed 'Best First'.
Re: [Semi-OT]: Perl's "popularity" versus other languages
by hippo (Chancellor) on Jan 03, 2021 at 12:52 UTC
Re: [Semi-OT]: Perl's "popularity" versus other languages
by LanX (Cardinal) on Jan 03, 2021 at 13:47 UTC
    Without having links at hand ...

    you could check

    • Job-search sites ... especially those for freelancers
    • Social-networks like linked-in, xing
    • Open Source repositories like github, CPAN
    • E-Learning sites
    • Boards like Stack-Overflow

    for statistics.

    Cheers Rolf
    (addicted to the Perl Programming Language :)
    Wikisyntax for the Monastery


    UPDATE: This reply was re-parented to the OP.

Re: [Semi-OT]: Perl's "popularity" versus other languages
by LanX (Cardinal) on Jan 03, 2021 at 12:48 UTC
    > Many aTdHvAaNnKcSe for any site suggestions

    What? I don't dare making suggestions now.

    That's a threat right?

    Cheers Rolf
    (addicted to the Perl Programming Language :)
    Wikisyntax for the Monastery

    PS: ;-)

    update

    turned out that it's not the name of the next pandemic disease but

    • "Thanks in advance. The word is formed by taking alternating letters from "thanks" and " advance "."
    interestingly I hat to copy that from a preview text in DDG while the original page in Urban Dictionary seems to have been deleted

      ... name of the next pandemic ... Maybe I should be more careful. After all, "Speak of the Devil and He appears."


      Give a man a fish:  <%-{-{-{-<

      while the original page in Urban Dictionary seems to have been deleted

      Perhaps your previous premonition of it being code for the next pandemic were shared by others...