in reply to Re^3: how to resolve IP's in an HTTPd that doesn't resolve them?
in thread how to resolve IP's in an HTTPd that doesn't resolve them?

OK sundialsvc4 , while I really appreciate your apparent attempts to lend a hand -- really.
This post is frankly frustrating. I pretty well alluded to the fact in my OP, as well as when I referenced a (DNS) resolver program I had written, that was IMHO pretty efficient (fast) returning hostnames, when fed a large number of IP's.

So, if I may be so bold; of course I'll be running a local DNS. In fact I have a whole DNS server farm I built/manage/run to accommodate this endevour, as well as all the domains, and associated services they entail.

So let us assume all of the above, when we're responding. K? :-)

Thanks :-)

--Chris

Evil is good, for without it, Good would have no value
λɐp ʇɑəɹ⅁ ɐ əʌɐɥ puɐ ʻꜱdləɥ ꜱᴉɥʇ ədoH

  • Comment on Re^4: how to resolve IP's in an HTTPd that doesn't resolve them?

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Re^5: how to resolve IP's in an HTTPd that doesn't resolve them?
by sundialsvc4 (Abbot) on Jun 14, 2018 at 23:48 UTC

    Excellent.   Of course I assumed that, but I felt that it was worth saying anyhow for-the-record, because I actually have encountered applications that got blacklisted by DNS servers.

    My sincere understanding remains that Apache by-default has precisely the information that is in the HTTP header, and the IP-address from whence the request came and to which the reply should be directed, and ... that is all.   As others have noted, you can have Apache do it, and as you have noted, you can do it yourself.   But in normal practice this does not occur.   Nearly all requests that any web-server expects to receive will not be associated with IPs that have any associated domain-name at all.

    Perhaps, in your apparent-edge case, that Apache directive might be just what the doctor ordered.   Perhaps that’s exactly the use-case that it was built for.   (And if you have local DNS servers doing cached lookups for you, performance might well be perfectly acceptable.)   Having said that, I would be quick to point out that I have no personal experience with it ... I have never yet had the need.

      For the sake of (preventing) further dilution on this (the original topic);

      Apache can only ever know what the host/server it's running on knows. Nothing more; nothing less. No matter what the value contained in the Apache directive HostnameLookups.

      I think we're done here. :-)

      --Chris

      Evil is good, for without it, Good would have no value
      λɐp ʇɑəɹ⅁ ɐ əʌɐɥ puɐ ʻꜱdləɥ ꜱᴉɥʇ ədoH