in reply to Re: Re: 0**0
in thread 0**0

0/-infinity, which is just another indeterminate.

Actually, 0/-infinity equals 0. It's not indeterminate. An indeterminate division would be something like infinity/infinity.

buckaduck

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Re: Re: Re: Re: 0**0
by Arien (Pilgrim) on Jan 17, 2003 at 07:38 UTC
    Actually, 0/-infinity equals 0. It's not indeterminate.

    Actually, the limit of 0/x as x goes to -∞ is 0. Infinity is not a number, it's a concept.

    An indeterminate division would be something like infinity/infinity.

    The limit for x to ∞ of x/x is 1.

    — Arien

      lim[x → ∞](x/x) = 1
      lim[x → ∞](2x/x) = 2

      Now which one do we take?

      Makeshifts last the longest.

        lim x → ∞ x/x was just an example to show that dividing two numbers that approach infinity is determinate. I didn't mean to suggest that the "division" of infinity by infinity has the value 1 (or 2, or any value for that matter).

        — Arien