And why exactly should I comment when I downvote a troll? Doesn't that just add to the problem? It's much more polite to the server and the team that spend their time keeping it up and running to just downvote a trollish node a couple dozen times instead of having two dozen "look! it's a troll!" replies.

A downvote is a comment. Yeah, it's a terse one that says "I don't like your node", but it's a comment nonetheless.

As for "common courtesy", you'll find that most things some group thinks are common courtesy are not that common and considered by at least some to be discourteous. If I ask you "do you like Chinese food?" I don't want an essay. I want to know if I should remember you next time we get Chinese take-out. In fact, I'd probably just avoid you if I got much in the way of explanation.

The vote buttons are a simple "do you like this node?" -- and the options are "yeah!", "no!", and "meh." (the last being abstaining).

I know, lets fix a system that is performing its function well by adding an arbitrary rule for no other purpose than enforcing some sub-group's idea of "common courtesy". That always makes things better.

For the record, I did downvote your node because of this little gem: "well, we made not just worst but most of the 10 or so 'worst threads of the week!' I'm quite happy about that." That looks like a troll to me.

<-radiant.matrix->
Larry Wall is Yoda: there is no try{} (ok, except in Perl6; way to ruin a joke, Larry! ;P)
The Code that can be seen is not the true Code
"In any sufficiently large group of people, most are idiots" - Kaa's Law

In reply to Re: Why downvote nodes without commenting on them? by radiantmatrix
in thread Why downvote nodes without commenting on them? by danmcb

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