Yet for some modules, the test suite is fully a third of the code produced.

It's a big chunk of Pugs, Rakudo, Parrot, and Perl 5 as well.

Now I'm all for better abstractions and reducing the amount of work to get the right results correctly (I did extract Test::Builder to make this possible for testing, after all), but complaining that a certain unnamed hypothetical test suite seems big to you is just as silly as complaining that you used string eval in a certain unnamed hypothetical production program.

The interesting question to me is "Why?" I agree that a blanket prohibition on one or the other is unhelpful just as I agree that a blanket prohibition on the use of symbolic references or even indirect object notation is unhelpful and likely wrong. That doesn't mean I want to throw a novice head-first into the whole debate over all of subtleties of community idioms and best principles when all he or she wants to do is know why the program doesn't work.


In reply to Re^3: Testing methodology, best practices and a pig in a hut. by chromatic
in thread Testing methodology, best practices and a pig in a hut. by BrowserUk

Title:
Use:  <p> text here (a paragraph) </p>
and:  <code> code here </code>
to format your post; it's "PerlMonks-approved HTML":