in reply to Re: Do you smoke tobacco?
in thread Do you smoke tobacco?

I wish I lived (and grew up) where you do. I'm allergic to tobacco and the response I get when I ask people not to smoke around me is usually along the lines of, "It's my freedom to smoke, it doesn't hurt you, you're just whining." Of course, even though the official policy of the U.S. military is against tobacco use, the majority of soldiers and sailors still smoke.

I once took the cigarette out of the guy's hands and broke it open, rubbing the tobacco on the backside of my forearm. As a rash quickly spread he started to apologize. Of course, the hospital visit wasn't worth it, but I was young and stupid once. I'm no longer young. :)

- - arden.
update: I guess I didn't openly state that in the case where I took the guy's cigarette he was in a no-smoking area and my first action was to point that out to him and ask him to stop smoking. As for the suggestions that he should have punched me, I'm a big, fast, and well-trained guy; go ahead and try!

Replies are listed 'Best First'.
Re^3: Do you smoke tobacco?
by been42 (Curate) on Sep 01, 2004 at 14:04 UTC
    I'm not allergic to tobacco, but I have pretty bad asthma and so does my son. It's not usually a problem at work, but nearly everyone in my family smokes. I manage to avoid them for weeks at a time, and my visits there consist of little more than my wife talking to them while my son and I go play with toys in another room. It's great for bonding with my son, not so great for my relationship with the rest of them. On the other hand, spending my life in another room allowed me to spend all of my time at the computer, leading to a decent career.
Re^3: Do you smoke tobacco?
by chime (Friar) on Sep 02, 2004 at 14:08 UTC
    Ireland where I live is the first coutry to have a smoking ban.
    ie. No smoking in an enclosed work place.
    This includes shop, pubs, restaurants, offices, all public transportion (even taxis).
    There are exceptions - long term residental homes, prisons etc.
    Norway has since taken it up

    There is approx 98% compliance with the ban
    It works because it not up to individuals to enforce the ban
    Those (ie pubs) who continually flaut the law are subject to large fines and possible prison sentances.
    Already there is a drop in tobacco smoking and alot of Irish have given up.

    There is a major difference in going out without having to smell like an ashtray coming home.
    And alot of pubs etc have smoking shelters or beer gardens to accomodate the hard liners.

      Australia has a similar ban. I've been very thankful for it, except when all pubs go smoke free. When I go Drinking, I want the full experience of getting sloshed in a seedy, smokey dive.

      Pubs in Australia have a choice of smoking/smokefree. I do feel sorry for the poor smokers, harried from their favourite sunless den of iniquity by crusaders who don't seem to realise the irony of preventing smoking in pubs for the patrons health

      OTOH I also believe the patrons should be allowed to whip out their bongs in a pub, so I guess I'd count as being a little out there.

      I love the smoke free restaurants though. Definately a improvement in quality of life.

      ___________________
      Jeremy
      I didn't believe in evil until I dated it.

Re^3: Do you smoke tobacco?
by csuhockey3 (Curate) on Sep 02, 2004 at 04:03 UTC
    It certainly is nice to have the smoking ban. I didn't realize how thick the smoke is in a restaurant/bar until I go to the next town over (without a smoking ban). I can't stand it anymore -- you really notice it much more once you have the luxury of being smoke free.
Re^3: Do you smoke tobacco?
by chicks (Scribe) on Sep 18, 2004 at 10:07 UTC
    I'm sorry you've faced such stupidity and inconsideration. I've support anti-smoking efforts for years and there are a growing number of folks even in a die-hard tobacco state like my own Virginia that believe breathing is a right and smoking is a choice. Sadly smoking is also a very tough addiction and that deserves some consideration too, but most folks capable of consideration seem to recognize that breathing is a much more important right to protect than smoking.

    I was in California when the smoking ban went into place. I know a number of folks with sensitive allergies and they were able to go into pool halls comfortably for the first time in years. At least in my unscientific survey business didn't seem to have slowed down either, so everybody wins including the wait staff having a lower chance of cancer and no ashen mess to clean up at the end of the shift. :)

    A reply falls below the community's threshold of quality. You may see it by logging in.