Another issue has just come to mind. With the object attributes being keyed on "$self", which includes the name of the class, you can no longer bless an object into a sibling class to implement state transitions.

Again, I guess some people would consider this a feature. I quite like the technique myself :-)

To overcome you'll need to strip out the class name. Assuming nobody changes the output format of references in later perl versions something like this should work.

package Foo; use strict; use warnings; use overload; my %foo = (); my %self = (); # we access self enough for it to be worth caching sub self { my $self = overload::StrVal shift; return $self{$self} if exists $self{$self}; $self{$self} = substr($self, index($self, '=')+1); }; sub new { my $class = shift; bless [], $class; }; sub foo { my $self = shift->self; $foo{$self} = @_ if @_; $foo{$self}; }; sub DESTROY { my $self = shift->self; delete $foo{$self}; undef %self; };

Also, there is another advantage to Abigail-II's method. Storing the attributes in separate hashes should less expensive in memory - buckets cost less than hashes. Might make a difference if you're creating lots of objects.


In reply to Re^4: Tutorial: Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming by adrianh
in thread Tutorial: Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming by jreades

Title:
Use:  <p> text here (a paragraph) </p>
and:  <code> code here </code>
to format your post; it's "PerlMonks-approved HTML":