More generally, the job is not rewarding enough, through pay, satisfaction, location, etc.

This is all basic micro-economics of supply and demand. If demand for "good" Perl programmers is high and the supply low, "prices" (i.e. rewards) must rise. Alternatively, employers will need to find a substitute, either lower-quality programmers or switching their projects (if they can) to a language with a higher supply of programmers and thus lower costs.

(Which may not prevent them from miscalculating what is really lower cost over the long term -- paying a lot for good Perl programmers or paying very little for crappy programmers in language X. Economics says that people are rational -- but not that they are good at math.)

-xdg

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In reply to Re^3: Where are all the Perl programmers? by xdg
in thread Where are all the Perl programmers? by johnnywang

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