in reply to Do complicated Perl programs really exist?

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Re: Do complicated Perl games really exist?
by grep (Monsignor) on Oct 17, 2006 at 23:11 UTC
    Can you make this easy for me please?
    Since I made it easy for you that last time, I assume you want the work done for you. Sure, I can do the work for you. Can you afford my rate?

    I want a direct link to a specific Perl game for windows xp, not a link to links to links to links! It must be a direct link to a specific program. Really I cannot find it in another way.
    Huh? You can look at A link, but going through more than one link to find what you want is impossible. Do you have some rare disability that no one has ever heard of (Web Superficialis, perhaps)?

    I gave 2 great sites for you to research your question and sgifford gave you a link to a game that seems to fit your arbitrary criteria. zentara linked you to game who's source is right here on PM, great for a quick evaluation of what perl game programming is like (without any of those pesky links to click on).

    Considering you're not willing to put ANY work into basic research maybe programming is not your thing.

    UPDATE: changed link to correct id - Thanks rcseege



    grep
    One dead unjugged rabbit fish later
Re: Do complicated Perl games really exist?
by chromatic (Archbishop) on Oct 18, 2006 at 01:32 UTC
    8. No extra operating system extensions or extra complex Perl language extensions have to be installed for the program to be installed. No updates of any kind should be necessary to install the game. No shell should be needed to install!

    This is an impossible requirement. You're not going to find what you want. Perl doesn't include any high-performance math or graphics libraries in the core distribution to make complex games, and I don't think there's anyone nuts enough to write a game for Windows that uses Win32::API to wrap enough DirectX or OpenGL calls directly to make a complex game like you say.

Re: Do complicated Perl games really exist?
by Anomynous Monk (Scribe) on Oct 18, 2006 at 00:23 UTC
    I've tried to analyze your requirements to see what you are really after, and only been able to come up with a far-fetched scenario:
    1. Your monitor was damaged by Midtown Madness
    2. You want to prove that Perl isn't a "real" programming language, so that
    3. You can show a court a fancy game written in a "fake" language that can't possibly damage hardware, so that
    4. You can prove that even a "toy" language can do fancy stuff without possibility of damaging hardware, and
    5. Thus the makers of Midtown Madness are negligent and owe you $
    Seriously, what do you expect us to make of you? How very, very odd.
Re: Do complicated Perl games really exist?
by shmem (Chancellor) on Oct 18, 2006 at 06:34 UTC
    Background on all of this........... I am not a usual programmer I haven't learned any language (except macro language in a hexeditor). I am an experimental programmer trying to find out the potential of Perl.
    I have no clue about athletics, but I want to find out the potential of my decathlon competitors, so I have them deliver the internal mail of my corporation to test them.

    potential of something != fitness for a particular purpose

    update: Perl has potential in the realm programming, you have expertise in the realm gaming. To find out the potential of Perl you have to evaluate it in it's realm - you must have certain expertise in programming.

    --shmem

    _($_=" "x(1<<5)."?\n".q·/)Oo.  G°\        /
                                  /\_¯/(q    /
    ----------------------------  \__(m.====·.(_("always off the crowd"))."·
    ");sub _{s./.($e="'Itrs `mnsgdq Gdbj O`qkdq")=~y/"-y/#-z/;$e.e && print}
Re: Do complicated Perl games really exist?
by Melly (Hermit) on Oct 18, 2006 at 09:12 UTC
    use strict; print "Do you want to play pinball?\n"; if(<STDIN> =~ /y/i){ `C:/Program Files/Windows NT/Pinball/PINBALL.EXE`; }
    Tom Melly, tom@tomandlu.co.uk
Re: Do complicated Perl games really exist?
by eric256 (Parson) on Oct 18, 2006 at 18:19 UTC

    What was wrong with frozen bubble? That port has a windows installer, installs in program files and runs clicking an icon.


    ___________
    Eric Hodges
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Re: Do complicated Perl games really exist?
by gregor42 (Parson) on Oct 20, 2006 at 13:47 UTC

    newbie -

    There seems to be a communication problem here.

    I am guessing by your spelling and sentence structure that English is not your first language.

    Based on your first node from 5 days ago it would seem that Perl isn't your first language either.

    You have been asking very specific questions and have responded to the answers you are getting as if to say "Answer the question I meant, not the one that I asked." This is a dangerous way to think, especially for a self-described newbie programmer, since the computer can't guess what you MEAN unless you SAY IT either.

    This has led to confusion both on your part as well as the people who have tried to help you and then felt as though their help was not properly appreciated.

    I will give you the benefit of the doubt. This is to say that I will assume that you are simply trying to learn and don't know the proper way of doing so.

    It would seem to me, from reading all of your posts, that what you are trying to do is to learn how to write games.

    Whether you realize it or not, people have been trying to help you. You are posting on a site devoted to Perl - so if you ask if something is POSSIBLE with Perl - the general answer you're going to get is YES, followed by examples - which is what you got.

    Someone has already mentioned to you however that it's not the Best Choice. There are a number of reasons for this. The first has to do with graphics - this is a tricky subject in ANY language. That's because different graphics hardware requires different types of software to make it work. Even Java3D has major problems working on more than one platform. You will end up either writing your code for a specific target platform or else you will end up writing multiple versions of code for multiple types of hardware & operating system setups. Another BIG reason is the ability to hide your source code. This might not be important for open source code or that developed by a single developer looking to use an open license, but most commercial game companies don't want the source code out there in the open. There are notable exceptions, but this is the trend.

    Now, I'm going to turn the point of this conversation back upon you. In your first node you mentioned that running programs from the command line "...would be very old fashioned for such a sophisticated language". I'm going to point out to you that no, it's not old fashioned. It's standard. If you want the icons to work when you double-click on them - then you have to DO SOMETHING to make that work. It's not magic and it's not automatic.

    A Command Line Interface (CLI) is the normal way to work with computers. Even Macintosh OS/X has a CLI - it's called Terminal. Why? Because using a mouse is a crutch. Pointing & Clicking is something that you take for granted because the software was written to support it. You need to learn how that works and a lot more to write games.

    Writing games is hard. Even "childish" ones. (I won't even touch the subject of "Gamers"/Otaku/Slackers being childish to begin with, since I am a self-described otaku.) If you want to take a close look at how the sophisticated games like World of Warcraft, Civilization, Soul Caliber, Halo, Grand Turismo, and Quake are written, then you will notice that it takes TEAMS of developers, graphical artists, voice over performers, etc. YEARS to produce these creations.

    So when you are looking for information about how to get started, it is appropriate to have more respect for the Experts and Seasoned Professionals that you are soliciting free advice from. There is an ediquette here. I believe that part of the negative reaction that you have received has been caused by misunderstandings regarding that ediquette.

    I hope this was of some value to you and I wish you luck on your journey of enlightenment.



    Wait! This isn't a Parachute, this is a Backpack!
    - Gregor42
Re: Do complicated Perl games really exist?
by Marza (Vicar) on Oct 18, 2006 at 08:26 UTC

    Interesting

    1. Games are not written to one OS as they tend to expire and not everybody chases new version. As I see from the others, you have been given links.

    2. Created in Perl?

    3. Not on the net? Would that not add to the complexity?

    4. A game that creates games?

    5. Joystick? Mouse? Most of the games I play don't rely on those.

    6. Complexity is matter of opinion. I don't consider, pacman or racing complex.

    7. The installer is not a mark of a complex game.

    8. You want a complex game but it can't use complex extensions?

    No updates? All games have updates.

    9. If you are going to run on a pc, there are extra procedures. For example monitor cards are not universal on how they handle rendering.

    "Why? I want to have a program in C++ called 'Counter' that can generate experimental programs by adding files together (files interpreted as large integers)."

    What was that about a game genrating games?

    "Why a game? Because I cannot understand most of the complex Perl programs that are around, they have complex interfaces and mostly code have to be added and all kind of extra things have to be installed like language extensions, just to start the programs up. But games mostly have a simple interface, that's why I choose to study games."

    What makes you think gaming theory is not complex? There was an attempt by a couple people here to make a game but it basically fell apart as peoples schedules changed.

    You just have to do it to find out. I am in the process of converting a couple old basic games for star trek and the battle of midway over to Perl. I would give them to you but they are not "complex"

Re: Do complicated Perl games really exist?
by Joost (Canon) on Oct 20, 2006 at 14:51 UTC
    Background on all of this........... I am not a usual programmer I haven't learned any language (except macro language in a hexeditor). I am an experimental programmer trying to find out the potential of Perl. Why? I want to have a program in C++ called 'Counter' that can generate experimental programs by adding files together (files interpreted as large integers).
    It seems clear to me that you would be better off paying someone else to create your program for you. A word of advice though - do not force your implementation details on them. You are clearly not experienced in software design. Describe what you really want, and let them figure out how to implement it.

    I want to have a program in C++ called 'Counter' that can generate experimental programs by adding files together (files interpreted as large integers).
    This is exactly what I'm talking about: do NOT ask for stuff like that because if you're lucky they'll only laugh at you. If you're unlucky, you'll end up having to pay for the implementation of a completely useless program.

    A certain coder on Rent A Coder.com told me that the best way to do this is a C++ program that generates Perl programs because Perl programs are hardware safe, so that dangerous instructions cannot harm the hardware of the computer.
    That coder is full of it. If a C program can harm certain hardware, a perl program can almost certainly do the same. By the way, I'd be more concerned about programs messing with the data / programs on my installation.

    Why a game? Because I cannot understand most of the complex Perl programs that are around, they have complex interfaces and mostly code have to be added and all kind of extra things have to be installed like language extensions, just to start the programs up.
    The fact that some program is a game does not necessarily make installing it any easier.

    But games mostly have a simple interface, that's why I choose to study games.
    Which will at most tell you that, yes, a game has been written in perl. It won't tell you that perl is acceptable for your project, since you clearly have no idea how to test that. That's only to be expected if you have no real programming experience, but if I may repeat myself for a bit, you should try get clear what you want first and then let someone who does have the experience do the program design and implementation. It seems you don't know what this "Counter" project you want is even supposed to do.

    update: slightly better structure, and spelling edits.