I'm thinking of sticking with IO::Select and it looks very easy. ... then I can do a can_read with a timeout, and if it doesn't time out I can use ->getlines to suck up what was sent

No, unfortunately it's not that easy. The reason is that can_read will fire even if there's only a single byte waiting to be read, and readline and friends will still hang because it's looking for a full line, which the server might not have sent.

srv.pl:

use warnings; use strict; use IO::Select; use IO::Socket; my $sock = IO::Socket::INET->new( Listen=>1, ReusePort=>1, LocalAddr=>'127.0.0.1', LocalPort=>1235 ) or die "sock: $@"; my $sel = IO::Select->new($sock); while ( my @ready = $sel->can_read ) { for my $fh (@ready) { if ($fh == $sock) { my $cli = $sock->accept; print "New client\n"; $sel->add($cli); syswrite $cli, "x"; } } }

cli.pl:

use warnings; use strict; use Data::Dumper; use IO::Select; use IO::Socket; my $sock = IO::Socket::INET->new( PeerAddr=>'127.0.0.1', PeerPort=>1235 ) or die "sock: $@"; my $sel = IO::Select->new($sock); while ( my @ready = $sel->can_read(1) ) { for my $fh (@ready) { print "Attempting to read...\n"; # all of these hang! #print Dumper($fh->getlines); #print Dumper($fh->getline); print Dumper(scalar <$fh>); } }

Note these aren't complete examples as they are oversimplified and lack error handling. Anyway, sure, you could implement your own routine to read the socket byte-by-byte until you've got a full line, but that's a wheel that's been re-implemented a million times (I've done it several times myself). Again: I strongly recommend you use a library that already provides this functionality!


In reply to Re^5: IO::Socket tutorial by haukex
in thread IO::Socket tutorial by BernieC

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