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AppleFritter's scratchpad

by AppleFritter (Vicar)
on Apr 27, 2014 at 20:42 UTC ( #1084032=scratchpad: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??

Misc. (unordered, unsorted):

  • Earlier versions of this node (Wayback Machine)
  • devdocs.io - "combines multiple API documentations in a fast, organized, and searchable interface". Covers many programming languages, markup languages, libraries, tools etc.
  • Perl Reference Card v2 (PDF)
  • Perl Best Practices Reference Guide (PDF)
  • Rebase issues in Cygwin, e.g.

    • "child_info_fork::abort: address space needed by 'IO.dll' (...) is already occupied"
    • "C:\cygwin64\bin\cygiconv-2.dll: Loaded to different address: parent(...) != child(...)"
    • "0 [main] python3.4m 9012 child_info_fork::abort: address space needed by 'lsoda.cpython-34m.dll' (0x5E0000) is already occupied" (yes, Python. Suck on it, Perlmonks.)

    Solution: rebaseall. The short version: run /usr/bin/rebase-trigger full, stop all Cygwin-based services, close all Cygwin terminals, run the Cygwin setup program.

    HARD MODE: if the above does not solve the problem: delete (or move) /etc/rebase.db.x86_64 (or .i386 for a 32-bit Cygwin); stop all Cygwin services and close all Cygwin terminals; open a cmd.exe window and run C:\cygwin64\bin\ash; run /bin/rebaseall -v.

  • Dictionary of Algorithms, Data Structures, and Problems
  • Suggestions for working with poor code
  • Higher-order Perl:
  • The Timeline of Perl and its Culture
  • "Evil uses for Perl":
  • Different programming languages:
  • Rants and criticism:
  • Perl forks etc.:
    • dave_the_m, Re: What's the perl5's future?:

      [...] AFAIKT, stableperl isn't intended to be an ongoing fork of perl; its simply a snapshot of 5.22 created by Marc [Lehmann] with whatever commits broke his code removed.

      cperl is a recent fork of perl by Reini Urban who is incapable of working with others, so is writing a perl where he can do whatever he likes, unfettered by the difficulties of having to reach consensus. [...]

    • cperl
    • stableperl
    • RPerl
  • Games:
  • Useful tools, scripts and programs:
  • Perl Obfuscator
  • Seven Levels of Perl Mastery
  • unmaintainable code
  • Hiding the source code for a Perl program:
  • Symbol names: Almost 28 new names for 32 old marks, Re: Almost 28 new names for 32 old marks
  • I want more monkquips
  • Perl Humour
  • Interactive Perl shell (aka Read-Eval-Print Loop): Devel::REPL (includes the re.pl shell)
  • perlepigraphs - list of Perl release epigraphs
  • How's your Perl?
  • Re^7: About GD Image Data Output Methods - description of the GD image format
  • Dominus's file of Good Advice:
    1. You cannot just paste code with no understanding of what is going on and expect it to work.
    2. You can't just make shit up and expect the computer to know what you mean, Retardo!
    3. You said it didn't work, but you didn't say what it would have done if it *had* worked.
    4. What are you really trying to accomplish here?
    5. Who the fuck cares which one is faster?
    6. Now is the time in our program where you look at the manual.
    7. Look at the error message! Look at the error message!
    8. Looking for a compiler bug is the strategy of LAST resort. LAST resort.
    9. Premature optimization is the root of all evil.
    10. Bad programmer! No cookie!
    11. I see you omitted $! from the error message. It won't tell you what went wrong if you don't ask it to.
    12. You wrote the same thing twice here. The cardinal rule of programming is that you never ever write the same thing twice.
    13. Evidently it's important to you to get the wrong answer as quickly as possible.
    14. Gee, I don't know. I wonder what the manual says about that?
    15. Well, no duh. That's because you ignored the error message, dimwit.
    16. Only Sherlock Holmes can debug the program by pure deduction from the output. You are not Sherlock Holmes. Run the fucking debugger already.
    17. Always ignore the second error message unless the meaning is obvious.
    18. Read. Learn. Evolve.
    19. Well, then get one that *does* do auto-indent. You can't do good work with bad tools.
    20. No. You must believe the ERROR MESSAGE. You MUST believe the error message.
    21. The error message is the Truth. The error message is God.
    22. It could be anything. Too bad you didn't bother to diagnose the error, huh?
    23. You don't suppress error messages, you dumbass, you PAY ATTENTION and try to understand them.
    24. Never catch a signal except as a last resort.
    25. Well, if you don't know what it does, why did you put it in your program?
    26. Gosh, that wasn't very bright, was it?
    27. That's like taking a crap on someone's doorstep and then ringing the doorbell to ask for toilet paper.
    28. A good approach to that problem would be to hire a computer programmer.
    29. First get a book on programming. Then read it. Then write the program.
    30. First ask yourself `How would I do this without a computer?' Then have the computer do it the same way.
    31. Would you like to see my rate card?
    32. I think you are asking the wrong question here.
    33. Holy cow.
    34. Because it's a syntax error.
    35. Because this is Perl, not C.
    36. Because this is Perl, not Lisp.
    37. Because that's the way it is.
    38. Because.
    39. If you have `some weird error', the problem is probably with your frobnitzer.
    40. Because the computer cannot read your mind. Guess what? I cannot read your mind *either*.
    41. You said `It doesn't work'. The next violation will be punished by death.
    42. Of course it doesn't work! That's because you don't know what you are doing!
    43. Sure, but you have to have some understanding also.
    44. Ah yes, and you are the first person to have noticed this bug since 1987. Sure.
    45. Yes, that's what it's supposed to do when you say that.
    46. Well, what did you expect?
    47. Perhaps you have forgotten that this is an engineering discipline, not some sort of black magic.
    48. You know, this sort of thing is amenable to experimental observation.
    49. Perhaps your veeblefitzer is clogged.
    50. What happens when you try?
    51. Now you are just being superstitious.
    52. Your question has exceeded the system limit for pronouns in a single sentence. Please dereference and try again.
    53. In my experience that is a bad strategy, because the people who ask such questions are the ones who paste the answer into their program without understanding it and then complain that it `does not work'.
    54. Of course, this is a heuristic, which is a fancy way of saying that it doesn't work.
    55. If your function is written correctly, it will handle an empty array the same way as a nonempty array.
    56. When in doubt, use brute force.
    57. Well, it might be more intuitive that way, but it would also be useless.
    58. Show the code.
    59. The bug is in you, not in Perl.
    60. Cargo-cult.
    61. So you threw in some random punctuation for no particular reason, and then you didn't get the result you expected. Hmmmm.
    62. How should I know what is wrong when I haven't even seen the code? I am not clairvoyant.
    63. How should I know how to do what you want when you didn't say what you wanted to do?
    64. It's easy to get the *wrong* answer in O(1) time.
    65. I guess this just goes to show that you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink it.
    66. You are a stupid asshole. Shut the fuck up.
  • Wikipedia on Smalltalk-80:

    Even the statement true become: false is valid in Smalltalk, although executing it is not recommended.

  • Joel (Spolsky) on Software:
    • Things You Should Never Do, Part I:

      They did it by making the single worst strategic mistake that any software company can make:

      They decided to rewrite the code from scratch.

  • Perl 6:
  • Python:
    • SciPy (includes NumPy and matplotlib)
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