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Re: Removing unwanted chars from filename.

by harangzsolt33 (Chaplain)
on Oct 08, 2022 at 00:40 UTC ( [id://11147288]=note: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to Removing unwanted chars from filename.

But you want to include plain ASCII characters that are legal though. No?

$FILENAME =~ tr| A-Za-z0-9\!\$\#\%\&\^\`\@\_\-\+\=\~\.\,\;\(\)\[\]\{\} +\/\\||cd;

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Re^2: Removing unwanted chars from filename.
by hippo (Archbishop) on Oct 08, 2022 at 09:25 UTC

    No. Our anonymous friend clearly wants to remove all the whitespace and the square brackets, both of which your operation keeps.

    What's the story with all those backslashes, BTW?


    🦛

      Well, I know that the tr operator expects a list of characters, but some of them have special meaning such as the minus sign. Where perlop.html talks about the tr operator, it says,

      "A character range may be specified with a hyphen, so tr/A-J/0-9/ does + the same replacement as tr/ACEGIBDFHJ/0246813579/. For sed devotees, + y is provided as a synonym for tr. If the SEARCHLIST is delimited by + bracketing quotes, the REPLACEMENTLIST has its own pair of quotes, w +hich may or may not be bracketing quotes, e.g., tr[[A-Z]][[a-z]] or t +r(+\-*/)/ABCD/."

      I don't understand what this means. I just know that certain characters have special meanings following the tr operator, so to be on the safe side, I just put a backslash before each.

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